Dear Dr. Hamer, dear Mr. Pilhar,

I want to share another report with you today, but I would like to go into more detail about our experiences with the doctors.

This report is about our son Yannik. Yannik is 12 years old.

I received a phone call from my mother one afternoon, in which she excitedly told me that Yannik could no longer close his right eye and the right side of his face appeared paralyzed. With such bad news, a thousand thoughts immediately shoot through my head… But I decided to keep a cool head and informed my husband first.

It was Wednesday afternoon, and our pediatrician, who has our complete trust because she is not a stubborn conventional doctor, didn’t have any more office hours today. So we had to go directly to the hospital for emergency medical service. The doctor there suspected a facialis paresis and said that Yannik had to be hospitalized immediately. I telephoned again with my husband, who went now immediately on the way to us.

On the way to the station, I agreed with Yannik that he would not have to stay here if he did not want to. He absolutely did not want to. Once there, we were led into a room for the admission interview, where we were supposed to wait for the doctor. In the meantime, my husband arrived for moral support.

The doctor who carried out the intake interview with us was relatively young and really went off the deep end. First of all, she asked about a tick bite. A tick had never bitten Yannik, and if he had, I wouldn’t have told her because we all know that ticks are definitely not the cause of meningitis or Lyme disease and the like. But she kept on harping on it and insisted that a tick had bitten Yannik. (Because you sometimes don’t notice that at all!!!??? She wanted to teach us something so that we do not grope in the dark and finally understand that the dangers lurk everywhere). So Yannik was to be admitted as an inpatient today because they would have to take blood. Tomorrow he would go into the tube, i.e., MRI, and then cerebrospinal fluid would be taken from his back. Afterward, he would receive antibiotics via the drip for a week; that was their therapy suggestion.

And then, we first pulled the emergency brake and told her that Yannik would not stay here overnight just because of the blood collection. We could do that now and take him home again. Of course, that was not possible. The blood could only be taken today if he was admitted as an inpatient. Then we told her that we would only agree to the MRI without a contrast medium. When she asked, I told her (already quite annoyed) that that was what we wanted. You should have seen how her features hardened, and she set her sights on me. Her tone was sharp, and she said this argument would not count. My husband hooked and explained that Yannik would be allergic to it (It was a lie, of course, but a white lie!). She could deal with that for the time being. We then explained to her that we would now take Yannik home. Of course, she had to point out to us, in the presence of Yannik, the possible dangers that could lurk on our child during this night at home. He could even die if another nerve, e.g., the respiratory nerve, were to fail. However, she could not impress us with that anymore. We both had to sign for it, so we arranged the inpatient admission for the next day because an outpatient examination was not possible.

When I got home, I first had to look in the chart book for the cause of such a cranial nerve paralysis (facial paresis). Dr. Hamer has there, among other things, “stroke.” This word is, of course, negatively afflicted by conventional medicine. The cause would be the conflict “to have lost face” or “to have made a fool of oneself.” Since paralysis = loss of function = ectoderm. Dr. Hamer writes, however, that it is probably an overlapping process, which also affects the facial muscle (mesoderm). That’s why I searched for the conflict considering his handedness.

Yannik is biologically left-handed. His right side, i.e., mother/child side, is affected. Since he does not have a child yet, the conflict had to be related to me. Now a question and answer game began with Yannik, in which he was very attentive because he too was absolutely interested in finding out the cause. Together with him, I actually found out very quickly where he had lost face with me.

Two days earlier, on Monday, I studied with him for an English paper. He had planned to improve his report card grade for this school year and asked me for help studying. Now I have to say that it is often not easy to study with him because he always knows everything better and argues that the teacher had said it that way. Pointless discussions usually follow this. Anyone who has children probably knows what I’m talking about. In any case, this time, I decided not to let him do that to me again, told him that, of course, he doesn’t have to study with me. If he knows everything better, he might as well study alone, and he got up and left the room. It must have been an hour before he came to me, apologized, and we continued studying.

On Tuesday, he did the paper, and he immediately told me after school that he had messed up the paper. But I don’t remember if and what I answered him at that moment. In any case, I did not scold him. That same evening, while saying good night, he said he couldn’t get his eye closed. It was dark, and I dismissed it because I didn’t understand that he meant it literally. I misinterpreted it and thought he couldn’t get to sleep. The following day, everything was the same. I didn’t notice anything about him, didn’t look for it either, because I had already forgotten the sentence from the evening. In the classroom, however, he must have noticed that something was wrong. He couldn’t concentrate while solving mathematical calculations, noticed again that his eye didn’t close and that he couldn’t whistle anymore…

What was now different than usual after the discussions and the subsequent writing of the test paper? In my opinion, something else must have been at play this time. Otherwise, he would have had to have this facial paresis more than once. This question could also be clarified rather quickly. It was the first time that he had spanked a test after these discussions and thus had the feeling of having lost his face on me, which he also confirmed to me. Of course, he expressed it only a little more childishly.

Now the conflict was found. We talked with him very lovingly for quite some time, explained everything to him, and gave him confidence that this paralysis would disappear all by itself now that the conflict had been solved. He had no problem with his appearance to exclude a possible second conflict about it for the time being. We took him to bed with us that night and bandaged his eye so that it would not dry out. Yannik and I were full of confidence and trust. My husband, however, I could see his fear for his child. He could not sleep and eat anything (worry conflict?). I was worried too, of course, but probably not as bad as he was. I, in contrast to him, have meanwhile regained my basic confidence….

The following day (Thursday), we could already see a slight improvement. He could close his eye with a lot of effort, not entirely but at last some. My husband thought about whether he should go to the hospital again because, following Monday, the two-week autumn vacation would start. Now my parents live almost next door to us, and they would not have understood this course of action and only reproached us. We already know this well enough. So father and son reluctantly made their way to the hospital.

That morning, the ward physician was on duty and had already been informed by her colleague about the unruly parents. However, she listened to our perspective that we could first do one examination after the other, wait for the results and then discuss the next step. She agreed and was able to gain my husband’s trust. The blood test showed that a tick bite did not cause 80-90% of the facial paresis. The remaining 10% would be found out with the cerebrospinal fluid extraction. My husband told her that he could do without the remaining 10%. With that, the topic of Borreliosis was off the table. The MRI did not reveal any further findings, but cancer could now be ruled out.Yannik had to stay in the hospital until Saturday morning and finally be presented to our pediatrician the following week, who researched the cause with the help of kinesiological muscle tests. She also determined (like us) a mental blockade/cause. From the hospital,

Yannik was to take medication that our pediatrician described as “hammer.” This medication (I think paracetamol) he should in no case continue to take. We only agreed to take the tablets to appease the doctors. In retrospect, this was wrong (because we noticed a change in Yannik’s character, and we could only read a leaflet later that confirmed this side effect – there were no leaflets in the hospital…), but we learned from this.

He received bio-resonance therapy from our doctor, which did not hurt him and could not harm him. So it remains to be seen why this facial paresis was gone again after a good four weeks. In any case, his inner attitude played a significant role, namely the confidence to get well again quickly. And that is what the doctor kept suggesting to him, and of course, we did too.

For us, despite everything, it was nice to see how much our child trusts us. We are grateful for the experiences we were allowed to have with our conventional doctors, to find out that one may calmly defy them and not have to accept everything. In the end, they could not tell us anything about the cause of this illness in Yannik, and we were able to take our child home again relatively quickly as inconvenient parents.

Dear Dr. Hamer,

I would have liked to get some advice from you on how we should behave towards the doctors in the hospital. But since I couldn’t reach you, we just tested it ourselves and are now very proud to have done it independently. We thank you from the bottom of our hearts for your tireless efforts. You were still a great help to us. Who knows, maybe Yannik would still take tablets now and thus possibly maintain the paralysis with it.

Dear Mr. Pilhar,

Thank you also for your great seminars. Who knows where we would be today without Dr. Hamer‘s insights and your teachings.

All the best and love
from Jens, Sabine and Yannik


Note by H. Pilhar

An Experience Report with “Guilt Medicine,” which had just gone well. Fortunately!
I advise all parents to deal with the Germanische Heilkunde for the love of your children, even before they fall ill. Try to see through this unscientific “Guilt Medicine,” which is not so difficult because it does not know the cause of any disease and tells us unscientific pseudo-therapies. Every therapy of a disease, whose cause is unknown, cannot be called scientifically approved. They are experimenting with your children – and mostly in a highly harmful and life-threatening way.

Be aware that it is you who have the responsibility for your child. Every “Guilt-physician” also let you sign this. No “Guilt-doctor” takes responsibility for his pseudo-therapeutic actions.

And it is the same “Guilt-physicians” who knowingly suppress the Germanische Heilkunde!

Discuss this in your family and circle of friends. You are in the duty of your children – and nobody else!

 

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